• BreathAndBeats

Burns: First Aid And Managing First, Second & Third Degree

Burns are a serious medical emergency and requires prompt medical assistance. Basically a burn is the tissue damage that can be cause by several reasons such as the skin being overexposure to the sun or other radiation, scalding, or the person coming in contact with flames, chemicals or electricity, or smoke inhalation.

Burns can happen even with a small flame of a matchstick. It is thus strongly advised to keep children away from flammable objects.  In any case if a person has experienced any sort of a burn or burns then the key for immediate relief is to provide quick first aid.

Burns can be of 3 types, which are – (i) First Degree Burns, (ii) Second Degree Burns, and (iii) Third Degree Burns.

Below mentioned are the first aid steps which should be provide to a burn victim, with important reminders to be kept in mind while performing these first aid procedure(s).

First-Degree Burns

It affects the top layer of the skin. Typical signs include stinging pain, swelling and redness, but no blisters.

  1. Cut the patient’s contact from the source of fire.

  2. The burn is likely to swell, so remove all constricting clothing and jewellery from the area.

  3. The burnt area should now be cooled down and soothed by holding or immersing it in cool (not cold) water for 10 -15 minutes. You can alternatively use a cold (not freezing) compress.

  4. Now you should wrap the burnt area using a non-adhesive bandage or clean cloth.

  5. Medicate with over-the-counter painkiller like Paracetamol, or anti-inflammatory like Combiflam.

  6. Get a tetanus shot right away, from a doctor in the hospital or clinic, if you haven’t had one in the last 10 years.

Always remember –

Do not apply butter, do not try to soothe with a potato, or do not attempt unfounded home remedies and visit a specialist immediately.

Second-Degree Burns

It affects the top two layers of the skin. Typical signs include stinging pain, swelling, redness, blisters, and scorched white or blotchy skin that covers more than 3 inches.

  1. Cut the patient’s contact from the source of fire, particularly in the case of clothing. Make the patient stop, drop to the ground, and roll to put out the flames. Tell them to face away from the fire.

  2. The burn is likely to swell, so remove all constricting clothing and jewellery from the area. If the material is stuck to the skin, don’t pull, just cut around it.

  3. Relieve panic and discomfort by assisting with slow and deep breathing.

  4. Cool and soothe the burnt area by holding or immersing it in cool (not cold) water for 10 -15 minutes. You can alternatively use a cold (not freezing) compress.

  5. Wrap the burnt area loosely using a non-adhesive bandage or clean cloth.

  6. Have the patient lay flat and try and elevate the burnt area and feet above heart level. Do not force if it causes great discomfort or the neck, head, or leg are injured.

  7. Cover the burn with a coat or blanket.

  8. Arrange to see a doctor who will decide further course of action including prescribing antibiotics, bandaging and cleaning, and administering a tetanus shot, if need be.

Always remember 

Do not apply ice, or do not try to break or soothe the blisters at home.


Third Degree Burns

It affects all layers of skin right down to the fat, and may have penetrated to the muscle and bone as well. Typical signs include blackened skin, charred residue, difficulty in breathing, coughing, carbon monoxide poisoning, and inability to move.

  1. Cut the patient’s contact from the source of fire, heat, smoke inhalation, and smouldering materials. If the clothes are on fire, make the patient stop, drop to the ground, and roll to put out the flames. Tell them to face away from the fire.

  2. Call the ambulance.

  3. Check pulse rate for circulation, and blocked airways by placing finger under each nostril.

  4. The burn is likely to swell, so remove all constricting clothing and jewellery from the area. If the material is stuck to the skin, don’t pull, just cut around it.

  5. Cover the burnt area loosely with a sheet, clean cloth, or non-adhesive bandage.

  6. Prevent burnt toes and fingers from sticking by placing sterile dressings in between. However, if they’re already stuck, do not attempt to separate them.

  7. Have the patient lay flat and try and elevate the burnt area and feet above heart level. Do not force if the neck, head, face, or leg are injured. If it’s a facial burn, make them sit up straight.

  8. Cover the burnt area with a coat or blanket that doesn’t leave lint. Ensure the patient is not feeling suffocated.

  9. Monitor breathing and pulse rate till ambulance arrives.

  10. Begin CPR if the patient is not breathing.

Always remember 

Do not attempt to cool or do not soothe large burnt surfaces with water as it can cause hypothermia (loss of body heat), or a drop in blood pressure. Also, in case of blocked airways, do not prop the patient’s head on a pillow.

ImportantImmediately contact the nearest hospital if the condition is life threatening.

Please Note – This tutorial does not substitute a formal training in Basic Life Saving Procedures or First Aid Procedures given by a licensed practitioner.

Reference –

https://www.nhp.gov.in

You May Also Like:

Pain In Your Back Or Side? Painful Urination? It Could Be Kidney Stones

Why You Must Take Hepatitis B Vaccine


Disclaimer

The content made available on this site is for informational purposes only and is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent diseases in any way. BreathAndBeats.com, it’s team and it’s content partners strongly recommend that you consult a licensed medical practitioner for any medical or health condition.


#burns #firstdegreeburn #seconddegreeburn #thirddegreeburn

0 views0 comments
OPENING HOURS

We are creative 24 / 7.

Drop in an email anytime.

GET IN TOUCH

For Brands - labs@ibossmom.com

Instagram - @i.bossmom